Polyandry in nature


Jacana spinosa – Palo Verde National Park, Costa Rica-8

In behavioral ecology, polyandry is a class of mating system where one female mates with several males in a breeding season. Polyandry is often compared to the polygyny system based on the cost and benefits incurred by members of each sex. Polygyny is where one male mates with several females in a breeding season (e.g., lions, deer, some primates, and many systems where there is an alpha male).[1] A common example of polyandrous mating can be found in the field cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) of the invertebrate order Orthoptera (containing crickets, grasshoppers, and groundhoppers). Polyandrous behavior is also prominent in many other insect species, including the red flour beetle and the species of spider Stegodyphus lineatus. Polyandry also occurs in some primates such as marmosets, mammal groups, the marsupial genus' Antechinus and bandicoots, around 1% of all bird species,[citation needed] such as jacanas and dunnocks, insects such as honeybees, and fish such as pipefish.

  1. ^ Evolutionary anthropology of the human family; In C. A. Salmon and T. K. Shackelford (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Family Psychology. New York: Oxford University Press.

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