World Wide Web


A web page displayed in a web browser
A global map of the web index for countries in 2014

The World Wide Web (WWW), commonly known as the Web, is an information system where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs, such as https://example.com/), which may be interlinked by hyperlinks, and are accessible over the Internet.[1][2] The resources of the Web are transferred via the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), may be accessed by users by a software application called a web browser, and are published by a software application called a web server. The World Wide Web is not synonymous with the Internet, which pre-dated the Web in some form by over two decades and upon which technologies the Web is built.

English scientist Sir Timothy Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web in 1989. He wrote the first web browser in 1990 while employed at CERN near Geneva, Switzerland.[3][4] The browser was released outside CERN to other research institutions starting in January 1991, and then to the general public in August 1991. The Web began to enter everyday use in 1993-4, when websites for general use started to become available.[5] The World Wide Web has been central to the development of the Information Age, and is the primary tool billions of people use to interact on the Internet.[6][7][8][9][10]

Web resources may be any type of downloaded media, but web pages are hypertext documents formatted in Hypertext Markup Language (HTML).[11] Special HTML syntax displays embedded hyperlinks with URLs which permits users to navigate to other web resources. In addition to text, web pages may contain references to images, video, audio, and software components which are either displayed or internally executed in the user's web browser to render pages or streams of multimedia content.

Multiple web resources with a common theme and usually a common domain name, make up a website. Websites are stored in computers that are running a web server, which is a program that responds to requests made over the Internet from web browsers running on a user's computer. Website content can be provided by a publisher, or interactively from user-generated content. Websites are provided for a myriad of informative, entertainment, commercial, and governmental reasons.

  1. ^ Tobin, James (12 June 2012). Great Projects: The Epic Story of the Building of America, from the Taming of the Mississippi to the Invention of the Internet. Simon and Schuster. ISBN 978-0-7432-1476-6.
  2. ^ "What is the difference between the Web and the Internet?". W3C Help and FAQ. W3C. 2009. Archived from the original on 9 July 2015. Retrieved 16 July 2015.
  3. ^ McPherson, Stephanie Sammartino (2009). Tim Berners-Lee: Inventor of the World Wide Web. Twenty-First Century Books. ISBN 978-0-8225-7273-2.
  4. ^ Quittner, Joshua (29 March 1999). "Network Designer Tim Berners-Lee". Time Magazine. Archived from the original on 15 August 2007. Retrieved 17 May 2010. He wove the World Wide Web and created a mass medium for the 21st century. The World Wide Web is Berners-Lee's alone. He designed it. He set it loose it on the world. And he more than anyone else has fought to keep it an open, non-proprietary and free.[page needed]
  5. ^ Couldry, Nick (2012). Media, Society, World: Social Theory and Digital Media Practice. London: Polity Press. p. 2. ISBN 9780745639208.
  6. ^ In, Lee (30 June 2012). Electronic Commerce Management for Business Activities and Global Enterprises: Competitive Advantages: Competitive Advantages. IGI Global. ISBN 978-1-4666-1801-5.
  7. ^ Misiroglu, Gina (26 March 2015). American Countercultures: An Encyclopedia of Nonconformists, Alternative Lifestyles, and Radical Ideas in U.S. History: An Encyclopedia of Nonconformists, Alternative Lifestyles, and Radical Ideas in U.S. History. Routledge. ISBN 978-1-317-47729-7.
  8. ^ "World Wide Web Timeline". Pew Research Center. 11 March 2014. Archived from the original on 29 July 2015. Retrieved 1 August 2015.
  9. ^ Dewey, Caitlin (12 March 2014). "36 Ways the Web Has Changed Us". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 9 September 2015. Retrieved 1 August 2015.
  10. ^ "Internet Live Stats". Archived from the original on 2 July 2015. Retrieved 1 August 2015.
  11. ^ Joseph Adamski; Kathy Finnegan (2007). New Perspectives on Microsoft Office Access 2007, Comprehensive. Cengage Learning. p. 390. ISBN 978-1-4239-0589-9.

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