Groundhog

Groundhog
Marmota monax UL 04.jpg
at Laval University campus, Quebec, Canada
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Rodentia
Family: Sciuridae
Genus: Marmota
Species:
M. monax
Binomial name
Marmota monax
Subspecies
  • M. m. monax Linnaeus, 1758
  • M. m. canadensis Erxleben, 1777
  • M. m. ignava Bangs, 1899
  • M. m. rufescens A. H. Howell, 1914
Marmota monax range.png
Groundhog range
Synonyms

Mus monax Linnaeus, 1758
Arctomys monax (Linnaeus, 1758)

The groundhog (Marmota monax), also known as a woodchuck, is a rodent of the family Sciuridae, belonging to the group of large ground squirrels known as marmots.[2] It was first scientifically described by Carl Linnaeus in 1758.[3]

The groundhog is also referred to as a chuck, wood-shock, groundpig, whistlepig,[4][5] whistler, thickwood badger, Canada marmot, monax, moonack, weenusk, red monk[6] and, among French Canadians in eastern Canada, siffleux.[7]

The name "thickwood badger" was given in the Northwest to distinguish the animal from the prairie badger. Monax (Móonack) is an Algonquian name of the woodchuck, which meant "digger" (cf. Lenape monachgeu).[8][9] Young groundhogs may be called chucklings.[10]:66

Other marmots, such as the yellow-bellied and hoary marmots, live in rocky and mountainous areas, but the groundhog is a lowland creature. It is found through much of the eastern United States across Canada and into Alaska.[11]

  1. ^ Linzey, A. V.; Hammerson, G. (NatureServe) & Cannings, S. (NatureServe) (2008). "Marmota monax". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2008. Retrieved 7 January 2015.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  2. ^ Thorington, R.W., Jr.; Hoffman, R.S. (2005). "Family Sciuridae". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 802. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.
  3. ^ Linné, Carl von (1758). Systema naturae per regna tria naturae. 1 (10 ed.). p. 60 – via Biodiversity Heritage Library.
  4. ^ "Marmota monax". North American Mammals. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 1 February 2015.
  5. ^ Seton, Ernest Thompson Lives of Game Animals, Volume IV, p. 300
  6. ^ Seton, Ernest Thompson, Lives of Game Animals, Volume IV, p. 300
  7. ^ Canadian Wildlife Federation - Faune et flore du pays - La marmotte commune
  8. ^ Chamberlain, Alexander F. (22 November 2018). "Algonkian Words in American English: A Study in the Contact of the White Man and the Indian". The Journal of American Folklore. 15 (59): 240–267. doi:10.2307/533199. JSTOR 533199.
  9. ^ Seton, Ernest Thompson, Lives of Game Animals. pp. 300–301
  10. ^ Schoonmaker, W.J. (1966). The World of the Woodchuck. J.B. Lippincott. ISBN 978-1135544836.
  11. ^ Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, North American Mammals, Marmota monax, Woodchuck, [1]

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