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YouTube

YouTube, LLC
The YouTube logo is made of a red round-rectangular box with a white "play" button inside and the word "YouTube" written in black.
YouTube homepage.png
Type of businessSubsidiary
Type of site
Video hosting service
FoundedFebruary 14, 2005 (2005-02-14)
Headquarters901 Cherry Avenue
San Bruno, California,
United States
Area servedWorldwide (excluding blocked countries)
Founder(s)
Key peopleSusan Wojcicki (CEO)
Industry
ProductsYouTube Premium
YouTube Music
YouTube TV
RevenueUS$15 billion (2019)[1]
ParentGoogle LLC (2006–present)
URLYouTube.com
(see list of localized domain names)
Alexa rankSteady 2 (Global, January 2020)[2]
AdvertisingGoogle AdSense
Registration
LaunchedFebruary 14, 2005 (2005-02-14)
Current statusActive
Content license
Uploader holds copyright (standard license); Creative Commons can be selected.
Written inPython (core/API),[3] C (through CPython), C++, Java (through Guice platform),[4][5] Go,[6] JavaScript (UI)

YouTube is an American online video-sharing platform headquartered in San Bruno, California. Three former PayPal employees—Chad Hurley, Steve Chen, and Jawed Karim—created the service in February 2005. Google bought the site in November 2006 for US$1.65 billion; YouTube now operates as one of Google's subsidiaries.

YouTube allows users to upload, view, rate, share, add to playlists, report, comment on videos, and subscribe to other users. It offers a wide variety of user-generated and corporate media videos. Available content includes video clips, TV show clips, music videos, short and documentary films, audio recordings, movie trailers, live streams, and other content such as video blogging, short original videos, and educational videos. Most content on YouTube is uploaded by individuals, but media corporations including CBS, the BBC, Vevo, and Hulu offer some of their material via YouTube as part of the YouTube partnership program. Unregistered users can only watch (but not upload) videos on the site, while registered users are also permitted to upload an unlimited number of videos and add comments to videos. Age-restricted videos are available only to registered users affirming themselves to be at least 18 years old.

YouTube and selected creators earn advertising revenue from Google AdSense, a program that targets ads according to site content and audience. The vast majority of its videos are free to view, but there are exceptions, including subscription-based premium channels, film rentals, as well as YouTube Music and YouTube Premium, subscription services respectively offering premium and ad-free music streaming, and ad-free access to all content, including exclusive content commissioned from notable personalities. As of February 2017, there were more than 400 hours of content uploaded to YouTube each minute, and one billion hours of content being watched on YouTube every day. As of August 2018, YouTube is the second-most popular website in the world, behind Google, according to Alexa Internet.[7] As of May 2019, more than 500 hours of video content are uploaded to YouTube every minute.[8] Based on reported quarterly advertising revenue, YouTube is estimated to have US$15 billion in annual revenues.

YouTube has faced criticism over aspects of its operations, including its handling of copyrighted content contained within uploaded videos,[9] its recommendation algorithms perpetuating videos that promote conspiracy theories and falsehoods,[10] hosting videos ostensibly targeting children but containing violent or sexually suggestive content involving popular characters,[11] videos of minors attracting pedophilic activities in their comment sections,[12] and fluctuating policies on the types of content that is eligible to be monetized with advertising.[9]

  1. ^ Cite error: The named reference verge 15b was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  2. ^ "Youtube.com Traffic, Demographics and Competitors". www.alexa.com. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  3. ^ Claburn, Thomas (January 5, 2017). "Google's Grumpy code makes Python Go". The Register. Retrieved September 16, 2017.
  4. ^ Wilson, Jesse (May 19, 2009). "Guice Deuce". Official Google Code Blog. Retrieved March 25, 2017.
  5. ^ "YouTube Architecture". High Scalability. Retrieved October 13, 2014.
  6. ^ "Golang Vitess: a database wrapper written in Go as used by Youtube". October 23, 2018.
  7. ^ Cite error: The named reference Alexa was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  8. ^ Loke Hale, James (May 7, 2019). "More Than 500 Hours Of Content Are Now Being Uploaded To YouTube Every Minute". TubeFilter. Los Angeles, CA. Retrieved June 10, 2019.
  9. ^ a b Alexander, Julia (May 10, 2018). "The Yellow $: a comprehensive history of demonetization and YouTube's war with creators". Polygon. Retrieved November 3, 2019.
  10. ^ Wong, Julia Carrie; Levin, Sam (January 25, 2019). "YouTube vows to recommend fewer conspiracy theory videos". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved November 3, 2019.
  11. ^ Orphanides, K. G. (March 23, 2018). "Children's YouTube is still churning out blood, suicide and cannibalism". Wired UK. ISSN 1357-0978. Retrieved November 3, 2019.
  12. ^ Orphanides, K. G. (February 20, 2019). "On YouTube, a network of paedophiles is hiding in plain sight". Wired UK. ISSN 1357-0978. Retrieved November 3, 2019.

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